How to calculate Cost Per Page or Cost Per Copy

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What is Cost Per Page (CPP) or Cost Per Copy (CPC) and how do I calculate it?

Posted by Dan Widdis on 1/16/2018 to News

What is Cost Per Page (CPP) or Cost Per Copy (CPC) and how do I calculate it?

Cost Per Page and Cost Per Copy are very similar, but do have some differences. CPP is typically the calculation of how much it will cost you to print a page on your printer – essentially how much the ink or toner will cost you not including the cost of paper, most times when CPP is discussed it isn’t intended to infer Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). CPC is a bit more involved, it is the cost involved to create a copy – typically on a stand-alone copier.

Before we go any deeper let’s touch on TCO for clarification. TCO will include the cost of the machine (whether buy or lease), paper, ink or toner, and maintenance. In this article we will not delve any deeper into TCO.

Now then, CPC is somewhat similar to TCO in that we like to take more into account than simply the cost of the consumables (ink or toner only), perhaps the reason for this is that the stand-alone copier typically costs significantly more and in many cases is on a lease agreement vs. the inkjet or laser printer that is almost always a cash purchase and most often does not carry a maintenance agreement.

Without going into too much detail about maintenance agreements and lease vs. buy options it is safe to say that nearly all leased copiers are required to have a maintenance agreement on them and CPC is handled on a per machine basis based on; the age of the machine, and the age of the lease contract (and how much the dealer has or has not invested in service thus far), they can range from .0125¢ per page to nearly .25¢ per page and does not include cost of paper – AND it’s important to note that whatever the dealer providing the maintenance contract assigns as your CPC you MUST double it IF you print on both sides of a sheet. CPC is billed from the built-in page counter and every pass of a page is counted. What’s included with this type of CPC? Ink or toner, developer, drums, circuit boards, service calls, etc. Sadly MOST people who have this type of agreement “think” their toner is FREE, little do they understand they are paying DEARLY for their toner. For this reason some buyers will opt for a maintenance agreement that includes “all but ink/toner” and will shop their own toner cost – this enables them to have a lower CPC maintenance contract AND a separate honest/actual CPC for their ink/toner. If buying ink/toner separately calculate your CPC by finding the estimated page yield (based on 5% coverage, your actual usage will vary based on what you put on a page but use the Mfr’s stated yield), now divide your ink/toner cost by this estimated page yield and you will have your ink/toner CPC, ie; estimated yield – 80,000 pages, cost for toner $179.00… $179.00/80,000=.0022375¢ CPC.

[***PLEASE NOTE*** As explained above, yield estimates are based on 5% coverage on an 8-1/2” x 11” page (imagine a solid black square about the size of 2-1/5” x 2-1/5” that’s an approximate equivalent of all of your letters and images crammed into a box and printed out). Page yields are based on pages printed, NOT days! I wish I had a dollar for every time someone told me their cartridge normally lasts “X” number of days – um yeah, if you “normally” print the SAME THING DAY AFTER DAY….! Cartridges are designed to print a specific number of characters/images on pages – NOT days.]

CPP is the commonly used term in calculating Cost Per Page for inkjet printers, laser printers, fax machines, MFC printers & copiers, etc. CPP is taking only the actual cost of ink, toner or other print media into account on the printed page, based solely on the manufacturer’s stated (estimated) page yield of the ink/toner/other in question, and using the same industry standard for calculations of 5% coverage. This calculation is used the same on ALL cartridges used to print a page, whether your machine uses only ONE black cartridge, or a series of black, cyan, magenta and yellow cartridges (and more in the case of some ink printers which can use as many as 7 different cartridges). So, be certain to calculate the separate cost of each cartridge you use when determining your CPP, and do the best you can to assign a fair usage to each. Some inkjet printers use a separate printhead, while some laser printers use a separate drum unit – these should be counted along with the ink/toner to get a more accurate CPP – especially if you are using consumables cost to help you make a decision about which printer to purchase.

Here is an example of how you might calculate the cost of printing with a color laser printer to compare one printer with another before purchasing one:

Calculating CPP for different COLOR laser printers

Canon LBP7110CW

vs.

HP M177FW

 

Cost

Pg Yield

CPP

 

Cost

Pg Yield

CPP

Black

$67.98

2,400

0.028325

Black

$47.85

1,300

0.036808

Cyan

$67.98

1,800

0.037767

Cyan

$47.85

1,000

0.04785

Magenta

$67.98

1,800

0.037767

Magenta

$47.85

1,000

0.04785

Yellow

$67.98

1,800

0.037767

Yellow

$47.85

1,000

0.04785

 

 

 

 

Drum

$75.90

14,000

0.005421

TOTAL CPP

$0.1416

TOTAL CPP

$0.1858

 

And here is an example of how you might calculate the cost of printing with a color inkjet printer to determine which cartridges you should be buying to save the most amount of money:

Cartridge #

Cartridge Cost

Pg. Yield

CPP

vs.

Cartridge #

Cartridge Cost

Pg. Yield

CPP

HP 62 Black

$13.00

200

$0.0650

62 XL Black

$20.00

600

$0.0333

HP 62 Color

$20.00

165

$0.1212

62 XL Color

$23.00

415

$0.0554

 

As you can clearly see – the “more expensive” option in both examples above are actually the less expensive option when you take CPP into consideration. This may not always be the case, and the informed shopper is wise to always do their due diligence and find out their CPP before making a purchase.

Here at PrintCartridgePro.com we take the hassle out of buying, that’s why we say “Where to go, when you need a Pro!” If you are unsure of what to purchase don’t just take a stab at it and hope for the best, contact us and we will be more than happy to help you make the best decision for your home or business printing needs.

www.PrintCartridgePro.com

Toll Free: 844-230-6384

mailto: Sales@PrintCartridgePro.com

 

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